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with affirmative action, and at the time, as you may have read and not remember, the civil rights movement, martin luther king turned to full employment and poor people's campaign as the principal demand, and the johnson administration rather than coming up with full employment we spotted with affirmative action. you won't see look at the eyes on the prize or marching in the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, asians, native americans, that was the vision. and she said when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper-middle-class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans, kids who want to go to these elite colleges, you know, that affirmative action was targeted or would benefit from. but we were scared of being read beaded and ostracized or attack so we backed down and just accepted that. he said we knew the poverty would remain in these basic issues of economic injustice would be made. i say this to say that movements can be the railed. they can be intimidated, th
that really limited the due process rights in civil commitments, and really look at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so it's kind of an ongoing project, and is in a host of different context, another talk by specific context, but this people, people civilly committed for mental because of mental illness. and there are a range of issues that the aclu has been working on with partner groups to actually address and raise the due process concerns about civil commitment. >> can you explain something about the philosophy behind incarceration, and why, what is the idea behind isolating a person so acutely? >> so, aside from the campaign to end overincarceration, the aclu likes of the campaigns, but another one is a campaign to stop the use of solitary or at least significantly curb its use. we've been very active the last several years litigating to prevent long-term isolation and to create benchmarks programs, access to se
of the piece, john cook, is not on the list. and action figures from "jango unchained" is from civil rights leaders and also al sharpton. and why is president obama nominating nothing but white males to the cabinet positions? the war on women continues straight ahead. greg? >> thanks, andy. >> you disgust me, greg. i was going to tell you why. >> why? >> it was only about maybe a month ago you were mocking me mercilessly for wearing a v neck sweater with a collar outside of it. >> really? >> yes. >> this is what happens when you leave your stuff at my place. >> you are just a little filth bucket. >> i am curious, you mentioned john cook. is that the john cook who lives in prospect heights? >> it might be. i'm not sure. jay in brooklyn -- >> in brooklyn? i think so. >> we can get his address. >> i don't know, maybe so. see you later, jerk. let's welcome my first guest. i am here are harris falkner, that's her name. and if hilarity were a gift card i would plow him at the olive garden. he is the co-host of the opie and anthony show. and in maine she considered a tackle box. it is bill schulz.
starting point is where people are. it may be that labor is a spent force and that civil-rights organizations are spent forces and the community-based organizations are narrow minded and too anxious to just get a foundation grant for government low-income tax credit to build five units of housing and it will not change the system, but that is where people are. for the last four years i have been working with the building insurance, the widest part of the labor movement. i have been working with them to try and get a young black and latino kids of color into the building trade so that they can become the green work force of the future. the building trade, conservative as they are, operates 1200 job training centers in the construction trade and is the second-largest mechanism outside the navy. guess what? they are actually in a coalition with youth bills, with many other organizations that train high-school dropouts, inner-city kids, working together for the last four years to say -- how do we change and improve? the national leadership of the building trade has gone across 350 c
or the anti-gun control movement -- >> the civil rights movement -- >> the civil rights movement. >> the suffragette movement, women's rights, you've got to be organized. >> absolutely. you've got to be organized. and what we see, remember that 16% i identified as the alarmed? again people who are very concerned and think this is an urgent problem, but they feel relatively isolated and alone. they say, "i feel this way, some of my friends and family feel this strongly." but they have no sense that they're part of over 40 million americans that feel just as strongly as they do. they've never been properly organized, mobilized and directed to demand change. and i mean, that's what the political system ultimately responds to. if you basically have a vacuum of people who are demanding change, and i don't mean that truly. i mean, there are of course many great organizations that have been advocating for change for a long time. but it hasn't been a broad based citizens movement demanding change. in that situation a relatively small but well-funded and vocal community that says no can a
into enforcement to the extent that a lot of advocates, particularly civil rights advocates, are actually very angry about it. it's never going to be perfect. i think that that's the place where the last comment that you read comes forward. we still have people who do constantly believe that a lot of them are criminals, drugging drugs or people. nobody wants that. so the question is, how much more needs to happen on the border and inside the united states before other kinds of reforms can happen? i believe that what the administration has been trying to say for the last two years is we've done that. look at the number of people we deported, something like 400,000 people, which is more than any president ever has in the last, you know, in all of history. the border is looking much better. i've been down, i've looked at it, it's looking better, but there are still problems. the question is, is it ok? that's going to be -- there's going to be competing versions of that no matter what happens. host: here are some of those numbers. on u.s. immigrant deportations, you can see the total so far during
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senator tim scott hammered by the naacp. the group says he doesn't believe in civil rights. well, that senator is now firing back. the governor sticks around to talk about that. >> plus, getting your hands on pot could soon be a button away. next to hit stores. marijuana vending machines. [ male announcer ] kids grow up in no time... marie callender's turkey breast with stuffing is a great reason to slow down. creamy mash potatoes, homestyle gravy and 320 calories. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >> republican senator tim scott was sworn in yesterday as first african-american senator in more than three decades. slamming the newly elected lawmaker on civil rights. senator scott is firing back. listen. >> we have republicans who believe in civil rights. you know, unfortunately he is not one of them. and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rinos as they call them. these republicans who believe in civil rights again and again. >> i think that it's tcontinue a nation. if you really think about where we are, we have the most diverse freshman class
accusing him of racial profiling and numerous other civil rights violations we don't have the time to list. but now sheriff joe tells us that he's the man to protect the children of phoenix. and this is yet another reason for why the vice president's task force must take a comprehensive and considered approach to the issue of gun violence. because when god men do nothing idiots tend to thrive. thanks so much for watching. chris matthews and "hardball" is next. >>> out of the way. obama's coming. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i think we're looking at a new barack obama. you know the expression let reagan be reagan. i think we're seeing barack obama be barack obama. an in your face challenge to the right wing. he's putting in a guy who knows the lessons of vietnam and iraq and putting him out front, making him his point man as he goes into the war of hawkish republicans who count the months between wars as an unwanted time-out. who like nothing more than the next war to fight. meet barack obama two. he's going t
there for reasons related to civil rights and seniority went into the republican party. and race began to fall away as the organizing principle in life. so the parties became more ideological separate from one another. democrats agreeing with democrats, republicans agreeing with republicans. as that happened, they began to act as units. we don't have a political system set up very well for parties to act as units. the founders didn't want there to be parties at all. they were very against factions even though they went on to create a number of them. the 112th was a culmination of a lot of trends we've been seeing over the last 40 or 50 years. and the composition of the congress in which you had a republican speaker from the republican minority in the house. you had a very slim democratic majority in the senate that was subject to the filibuster and a democratic president the republicans were trying to defeat was a perfect cocktail for this paralysis and polarization but i'm not optimistic about the 113th because even if they do try to do things through regular order, these same underlying dynamics
-- no it is a right for god's sake. >> stephanie: right. i think that's what has made this civil right's movement go so much faster. is because of that. >> caller: right. >> stephanie: and i'm also -- was a practicing catholic. i got so good i went professional, so i don't practice anymore. but i never thought about it. >> caller: yeah, see my attitude was always that god doesn't have any discretion of who he loves. so that wasn't it but it was like, oh you know, no. and now i'm like my god what happened? when the president did it made it a universal thing. >> stephanie: i think chuck hagel is generally a good guy, and i think at that time all around the world there was still a lot of homophobia. the way it sounds now, we go that's really homophobic. >> caller: yep. i love you guys. and i get up early in the morning so i'm watching you guys early. >> stephanie: yay! she's precious. [ applause ] >> stephanie: here is a story that will make you feel better whether you are gay or straight -- [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: oregon man arrested for choking his girlfr
. >> stephanie: yeah, the referendum in new jersey he said we should not be putting civil rights to a popular vote. so boy, i hope this all gets resolved at the supreme court. >> if we had you still wouldn't have been able to eat at the same table as black people. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: the headline chris christie is able to fill the void. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: looks like he is positioning himself for 2016 presidential run. although he said it would be crazy for anyone to try to plan four years from now. [ cuckoo clock chimes ] >> stephanie: a new poll shows christie crushing -- [ laughter ]. >> that's awful. we need acceptance. >> stephanie: yes, stop putting in immature sound effects. >> so you are saying chris christie wants to run. >> that's all we can do. >> stephanie: he was born to run. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: seventeen minutes after the hour back with more fridays with fugelsang on the "stephanie miller show." >> very interesting but stupid. >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ [ ryon ] eating shrimp at red lobster
forfeit its rights. however, we cannot give amnesty on behalf of people because it is the civil right to. amnesty would be general, and only by this amnesty we can get into national reconsolation, when everyone forgives everyone else. these are the main features of the political solution, as we see it. these are only just the headlines that need details, which the government will begin to put details and expand on these points and put this vision in the form of an initiative. this would be followed up in accordance with the way it is laid down. we need to put every topic in its context. we live in times of falsehood and manipulation. this is something we do not do. it is done by them. we need to put these things in the right context and put the right definitions. some, when they see this vision, they think there is a return backwards from the security point of view. i would like to reassure everybody, as far as fighting terrorism, we will not stop fighting terrorism as long as we have even one single terrorist in syria. this does not mean we're going to lessen the fight on terrorism. [ap
top-down pressure. sometimes it happens by movements like civil rights moment or right to vote for women in this country and sometimes it has to come from top down change. when that top down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. by in large they are not perceived to be effectively active and enforced so the exploiter does not have to adapt too much or adapt just enough to avoid identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. in a particular way of asking that question, i would like to hear you say what your study on the shrimp supply chain suggests about an appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it m
the finger to a cop can sue. the arrest was not lawful. the man's attorney calls it an important civil rights victory. unus >> announcer: this national weather report sponsored by subway restaurants. subway. build your better breakfast. >>> it is a story that has torn an ohio town apart. it involves high school football stars, allegations of rain and digital vigilante act. many believe it was not a crime. >>> and environmental groups accuse shell of going too far looking for offshore oil in alaska. john miller has the story of a shell drilling ship suspected of being criminally unsafe on "cbs this morning." >> announcer: this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by the u.s. postal service. schedule your free package pickup today. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ try our entrees, snacks and new salads. salmon with basil, garlic chicken spring rolls, and now salads, like asian-style
group of prisoners in new york, persons incarcerated through civil commitment without a right to a hearing beforehand or to a lawyer or right to confront accusers? and with rules of evidence suspended? this and no right to a lawyer afterward, after the person's rights are compromised and their credibility especially? is anyone looking into the constitutional violations? >> yes. the american -- the aclu has actually been very active on this issue, but the united states supreme court several terms ago, actually, issued a ruling that really limited the due process rights of those in civil commitments and really rooked at it, contemplated it as an extension of the existing criminal sentence. and so, but it hasn't stopped the litigation, but there is a lot of work that needs to be done still on civil commitment issues. and so that's -- it's kind of an ongoing project, and it exists a lot in a host of different contexts. i don'ti don't know if you're tg about a specific context, but for sex offenses, people committed for mental, because of mental illnesses and there are a range of i
for civil rights under law which runs the election protection coalition. the election protection cohiggs was founded roughly right after the election debacle in 2000 in florida, and we've been operating election protection as a program ever since and really our first operation was in 2001. we are composed of 150 nationwide, statewide, local, grassroots organizations that are supplemented by the resources of 200 law firms. we, this last election we operated 28 call-in centers, we had on of the-ground operations in over 80 jurisdictions, we had 5,300 legal volunteers and roughly 2,300 grass roots vols tiers -- volunteers. this, as you can imagine, i'm very grateful for this opportunity to comment on the recent 2012 elections. the lawyers' committee will actually be issuing more election protection, a major report this month. so in two weeks you should be able to access our analysis based on the roughly, you know, 190,000 calls we received, the grassroots reports from these 80 jurisdictions and everything else. our basic conclusion may be different than what you heard in the first panel bec
with on a number of issues, still many feel that gay rights like marriage equality is a civil rights issue. the "talk back" question for you today, should we welcome pastors in the public square despite their views on homosexuality. facebook.com/carolcnn, facebook.com/carolcnn. or tweet me at @carolcnn. i'll be right back. >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us, i'm carol costello. time to check the top stories. >>> the federal government wants to give boeing's newest airline another look. the department of transportation will conduct a comprehensive review of the boeing 787 dreamlin dreamliner's critical systems including design, manufacturing, and assembly. the federal government says the aircraft are safe to fly. the 787 has had a pretty difficult week, though, incidents include a fire that started in the battery compartment of a japanese airliner and a fuel leak in another japan airlines jet. >>> afghan president hamid karzai arriving at the white house minutes ago for a one-on-one meeting with president obama. the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan topped the agenda.
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
that standard going to be and how are going to test people in a way that complies with the civil rights but, of course, has the overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out pro and con for law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado. about public safety implications and whether moving toward legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i appreciate your point that i would tell you i suppose worked a lot on my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i've heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. one thing we have to do now is come up with a standard that will protect people who come and visit our state and drive on the roads so that people know that there is going to be a safe system for them. and we're not sure yet how to do that to our legislature has this as job one that starts this next week in colorado. i think your point of view, your input would be really valuable in our state. >> you are against legalization and colorado, is that right? >> yesterday i was suppos
administration. i would also point out, wolf, that john mccain is on the same side as the liberal civil rights group the aclu in this. they are raising the same kinds of questions. even though in the past, brennan has said that he opposes these enhanced interrogation techniques. >> we'll watch these confirmation hearings every step of the way. >> should be interesting, both of them. >> low flying helicopters have people in some of the country's biggest cities asking questions. the answers have to do with preparations for a possible terrorist attack. using radioactive dirty bombs. >>> plus, before we get to that, we have some new details emerging about the colorado theater shootings, including the suspect's strange behavior once he was caught. uncer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's
like civil rights movement or getting the right to vote for women in this country, and sometimes it has to come from top-down change. when that top-down change is perceived to be efficiently enforced, then the exploiter has to adapt. what you see with forms of slavery today there are laws, there are penalties. buy and large they are not perceived to be efficiently enforced, so that the exploiter doesn't have to adapt too much or just enough evade identification. >> thank you for a stimulating presentation. i want to get your reaction to the idea in general terms that maybe the diagnosis is only as good as the remedy it prescribes. as a more particular way of asking that question, i'd like to hear you say what your study of the shrimp supply chain suggests about appropriate remedy for the exploitation that we're seeing there. and secondly, in more conceptual terms, all related to remedies. if you excuse me asking more than one question relating to different parts of your presentation. secondly, whether in conceptual terms it might not make more sense to draw a line between slavery and ot
life. for a lot of americans, i mean, that's a war that's about principle, right? and the civil war is about principle. and world war ii's about principle, and world war i's about principle but then we have these other battles, these other wars that people are involved in that really aren't about principle. and certainly the u.s./mexican war fell into that category. >> quick question about the -- [inaudible] >> yep. >> i'm sure you can have a lively discussion about the treaty and how -- [inaudible] >> yeah. >> [inaudible] 67 years later there's a huge push to -- [inaudible] >> yeah. >> there's a huge push to -- [inaudible] >> right. >> in 1912 there's a strike in bloomington, illinois, which is not far from here, where they imported mexican labor. it's out of the newspaper. >> yeah. >> and when the mexican workers got here and realized that the union was on strike, they refused to work and effectively ended the strike. so there's a huge turn around as far as attitude and, again, the people, what happened to the -- >> well, there is but there isn't a change in attitudes, right? i me
problem. for "tkn," i'm scott. >> there's more "teen kids news" coming up next. >> we'll be right back. [ explosion ] >> in 2012, turmoil continues across the middle east. syria's civil war shows no signs of slowing down, with over 40,000 people dead from the 21-month conflict. in egypt, ousted president hosni mubarak receives a life sentence for his role in ordering the killings of protesters, while the muslim brotherhood's mohamed morsi wins in egypt's first free presidential election. but violent protests break out after he grants himself sweeping new powers. in libya, a terrorist attack on a u.s. consulate in benghazi kills four americans, including u.s. ambassador chris stephens. the hard-fought presidential campaign comes to an end. barack obama wins a second term, defeating his republican rival, mitt romney. mother nature shows no mercy. hurricane isaac hits louisiana on the seventh anniversary of katrina, delaying the republican national convention in florida. superstorm sandy, the biggest atlantic storm in history, blasts her way across the northeast, killing over 100, leaving
get accused when i get you guys on of talking over you, of being rude. i'm trying to be civil. you have got to try and answer some of the questions, right? here is my issue for you. why do people need, civilians need an ar-15 type assault weapon? >> i said statistically, they're using in a low amount of crimes. that's an fbi act. >> but they have been used in the last three mass shootings. >> because they advertise in the media. everybody knows if someone jumps off the empire state building, they put security out there because there are copy cats. go commit suicide by killing a bunch of kids and use this because this is what the army uses. >> why do they need them? >> to protect us. a study shows they killed 290,000 people. google it. >> should everyone in america have an ar-15 if they want one? >> statistically, where there's more guns, there's lower crime. >> the 23 richest countries, you have -- >> america was born on guns and whiskey. it's true we're a violent society. >> right. america has the most guns -- >> have you seen the fbi numbers? knives, bats, rocks, kill many, many
kinds of laws we can pass that will aid in that effort right after the shooting my family and i established the fund. we call it the fund for civility, respect, and understanding. we focused the last two years on addressing bullying in school, which we know has a link to mental health concerns and violence. we're working on mental health, but also at the beginning i want to focus more and more on the issue of background checks, and the availability of large capacity magazines. you know, many tucson where we were shot two years ago today, the young man who shot us -- the young man who shot us had a magazine with 30 bullets in it. he had another one in his pocket, and two more smaller magazines. in 45 seconds or less 19 people were down and nine of them died. we really have to address not only the mental health aspect of this issue, but the availability of that kind of high firepower weaponry. >> i know you were observing this anniversary quietly in the community and with some of the survivors. you are going to be going back, i think, to the hospital center that treated you. how a
is the right man for the job. boots on the ground combat troops land in turkey. are we one step closer to being drawn into the serious civil war that story next. another obama ultimatum. the imperious president unrelenting in his spending plans and habits. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill that have already racked up. congress refuses to give the as is the ability to pay bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy to be catastrophic. >> the president does not want congress to slow down his free-spending ways. former cbo director douglas will seek an joins us next. ♪ ♪ lou: joining me now, former director of the congressional budget office, president of the american action form, but this will secant joining us tonight from washington d.c. good to have you with this. we have hit the debt ceiling, so says the treasury secretary. i'm not sure where we are. is that right? every actually hit it? is the treasury secretary's speaking metaphorically in some way? >> well, running close to the limit and then the secretary
and corporate america isn't somehow reined in, there will be massive civil disobedience in this country. >> host: all right, john, we got your point. thank you. mr. barlett, response for that caller. >> guest: well, there's a lot there. and you could, you could do a whole book on the federal reserve. actually, bill greider a few years ago did a really fairly decent job on the federal reserve. one thing that i've learned over the years is don't talk about something you haven't spent any time studying. and so i just don't know. is that a fruitful area to look at? absolutely. and especially when you look now, because now it's being driven home to me that you can have massive debt without high interest rates, which is something i didn't think would ever occur. i'm talking about the federal government. because if you went back, you know, back into the greenspan era, the government interest rate, the government was paying 16, 17%. and you kept, you keep looking at the size of this growth, and you say, wow, this is impressive, 2, 3%? i don't know. i don't know what the -- i don't know how that's explai
what is realistic and what's not and that assault weapons ban is right there smack in the middle of everything. >> thanks very much, gloria. >>> more than half a million people are fleeing syria's civil war and now winter is compounding the misery for many refugees. >>> plus, details from this spectacular winter phenomena. impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance,
more fire men and civil workers down here. he needs to go and go fast. host: maxine offering her political opinion. guest: first and foremost, you are right, ohio eliminated its estate tax. it used to have an exemption of only about $385,000, one of the lowest in the country's estate death taxes. but ohio is one state that is repealing its estate tax. here in our neck of the wisdom of virginia no longer has an estate tax, while the district of columbia and maryland do. as a result, people are moving from d.c. and maryland, crossing the potomac river and taking up residence in virginia in anticipation of the death and estate tax. as far as income tax in ohio, you have township taxes in addition to the state income taxes. there is a very interesting wrinkle or sometimes it is better to file separate then -- separate than file joint returns. host: "the new york times" has a piece that talks about the high earners, but it says the legislation approved by both houses of congress would increase taxes on people with incomes that are not quite as high as well, because the bill includes l
's right. >> you can be sure that legislators and lawmakers in new york and new jersey will be making a stink if that second part doesn't get passed. >>> at least 80 people died in civil war fighting in syria today according to opposition groups. with bloodshed increasing in the suburbs around the capital damascus. the united nations now puts the toll from almost two years of fighting at more than 60,000. meanwhile, u.s. troops have now arrived in turkey to man patriot missile defense batteries near the border. here's the latest from istanbul. >> reporter: reports emerged yesterday, turkish media saying that 27 u.s. military personnel have flown into the southern city and are about to begin sight surveillance where these patriot missile batteries should go. but it was embellished today saying they have begun the process of flying in military personnel equipment into the military base in the south of the country. that will continue in the weeks ahead. dutch, german missile batteries and military personnel also joining them as nato answers turkey's request for extra defense along that v
of the 90 than it is to get 51% out of the 10. and i just, i would short your efforts right now, john. >> well i think it's a real struggle. but i don't think it's one we can give up on. because it's a huge -- i think it's the future of western civilization. these policies we're implementing today don't work. they've been proven to fail in history. countries have fallen over and over again -- >> there have been periods like this before, john? we've never had this many people on the receiving end of government in the united states. >> not in the united states. >> no. >> but i think, i do think that the republicans need a real message that's a more libertarian message. it's hard to know whether obama won over economics or whether he won over social policies. >> that everybody gets to use their own -- >> there's a lot of -- >> i understand. >> simpson bowles, alan simpson and erskine bowles, bipartisan group, they have been trying like mad to get people to pay attention to this message. they're out against today. they're going to have another time-out and the fiscal message, the bipartis
that any kind of technology that was around when you were born is right and natural. is in the natural order of things. anything that comes along and around the age of 35 is fascinating and exciting and brilliant. anything that comes along after that is best to civilization and is going to destroy humanity as we know it. i think i am very lucky in having the job that i do, because i don't have the leisure to be incredibly blessed doubt it for my childhood. that was a world that i was not part of an was unlikely to ever be a part of. the kind of coverage that we get from anybody with a cell phone, all over the world, sullivan unreliable, is still astonishing and necessary. you brought up the arab spring. it brought up real-life coverage of hurricane sandy. it is everywhere we need to be, to paraphrase some advertisement or other. it is a great, wonderful new world. the big difference is that you as the news consumer have to do the work they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and
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